just another person trying to become an "adult" one socially acceptable decision at a time.

31st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Birds on the Brain with 464 notes

scienthusiasts:

Clathrus archeri, commonly known as Octopus Stinkhorn or Devil’s Fingers, is a type of fungus that is native to Australia and Tasmania. It begins its life in a sub-erumpent egg, then erupts into four to seven elongated slender arms initially erect and attached at the top, which eventually unfold to reveal the spore-containing gleba. In its mature stage, it gives off a foul odor, hence its classification in the stinkhorn family, or the Phallaceae. The smelly spores attract flies and other insects, which contribute to the dispersal process.

Source: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4

Source: scienthusiasts

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Work-In-Progress with 88,238 notes

henrrywinter:


entelecheia — in the philosophy of Aristotle, the condition of a thing whose essence is fully realized [x]

#OKAY BUT IF THIS IS AN ANGEL—IF THEIR HALOS ARE THE UNFLAWED AND FULLY REALIZED CIRCLE#THAT MEANS THAT IN FALLING—IN BECOMING DEMONIC#THE CIRCLE CRACKS#THE DEMON’S HORNS ARE THE VESTIGIAL HALO#A CONSTANT SYMBOL AND REMINDER OF THEIR FLAWED-NESS; THEIR INCOMPLETENESS#I’M!!!!! (notbecauseofvictories)

henrrywinter:

entelecheia — in the philosophy of Aristotle, the condition of a thing whose essence is fully realized [x]

 (notbecauseofvictories)

Source: notbecauseofvictories

31st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Art Of Animation with 1,700 notes

theartofanimation:

Jerome Moo

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Work-In-Progress with 27,459 notes

bogleech:

thebeldamsbuttons:

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK
We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

Did you guess yet?

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.
Have you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”
Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

This isn’t even being qeued. This is just being reblogged, because some of you still don’t understand who directed Coraline.

Burton didn’t even have a TANGENTIAL connection to Coraline but because it was advertised as “from the director of Nightmare Before Christmas” and people think Burton directed Nightmare (or even wrote the script or did much of anything but visit the set off and on) they still equate Coraline with him.
The same thing happens to “9” because people don’t get what “produced by” means.

bogleech:

thebeldamsbuttons:

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK

We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

image

Did you guess yet?

image

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

image

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

image

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.

imageHave you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

image

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”

Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

This isn’t even being qeued. This is just being reblogged, because some of you still don’t understand who directed Coraline.

Burton didn’t even have a TANGENTIAL connection to Coraline but because it was advertised as “from the director of Nightmare Before Christmas” and people think Burton directed Nightmare (or even wrote the script or did much of anything but visit the set off and on) they still equate Coraline with him.

The same thing happens to “9” because people don’t get what “produced by” means.

Source: damianimated

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from The Oatmeal with 8,841 notes

oatmeal:

Today, illustrated.  More comics here.

oatmeal:

Today, illustrated.  

More comics here.

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Laughing Squid with 798 notes

laughingsquid:

Adorable Japanese Food Pun Stickers

laughingsquid:

Adorable Japanese Food Pun Stickers

31st July 2014

Chat reblogged from cough into my open mouth with 22,093 notes

the year according to tumblr

  • january: post halloween candy hangover
  • feburuary: couples halloween
  • march: almost halloween
  • april: almost halloween
  • may: almost halloween
  • june: almost halloween
  • july: almost halloween
  • august: almost halloween
  • september: basically halloween
  • october: HALLOWEEEN!!!! HALLOWEEEEEEENNNNNN ARRHFJFJFNDHNDJ SKELETON SPOOK !!!!? AAAA
  • november: still halloween
  • december: halloween for jesus

Source: carbinks

31st July 2014

Video reblogged from Work-In-Progress with 23,562 notes

skyphoi:

image

Source: vinebox

31st July 2014

Post reblogged from Work-In-Progress with 14,925 notes

add-it-up-add-it-up:

kimbras:

sadvaporwavebabe:

reminder to call your pets by their proper pronouns! use petself/dogself/catself/hamsterself etc because they are not able to communicate their preferred gender and pronouns thank you this has been a psa uwu

image

 

Source: sadvaporwavebabe

31st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from People of Color in European Art History with 2,757 notes

medievalpoc:

behind-the-book:

High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)

Read More

This goes right into the “books" and "resources" tags.

I’ve featured quite a few of these books for Fiction Week, and I know that many educators would be interested in a list like this. Thanks for making it.

Source: behind-the-book